The Dork Forest

Dork on Dork Dialog with Jackie Kashian. I am interested in whatever dorky thing you want to talk about. Guests speak to their love of books, TV, Movies, Comic books, websites, food, wrestling, cars, action figures and bees. There is room for all in The Dork Forest. This is a safe space. Credits: Music composed and performed by Mike Ruekberg (Sarah Cohen on intro) Audio fixes by Patrick Brady Website design by Vilmos
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jackiekashian.com Archive - Pre-September 2010 donate to the dorky effort
May 22, 2012

Corey Olsen is The Tolkien Professor. I grill him about Tolkien and then I Iet him talk about more modern fiction… so it’s all books all the time. His book Exploring the Hobbit is available for pre-order. I am excitable and on-freaking board. Listen and enjoy.

 

Donation Button, if you wish is on www.dorkforest.com

 

NOTES:

The Hobbit

Elven Rings of Power:

Nenya

Narya

Vilya

Sarehole Mill

Silmarillion

Letter from CS Lewis just a reference to it.

On Fairy Stories

The Goose Girl

The Games of LOTR

Lord of the Rings Game - Fellowship

Til We Have Faces – CS Lewis

Charles Williams – The Greater Trumps

Space Trilogy – CS Lewis

Peter Beagle – The Last Unicorn

Wizard of Earthsea – Ursula Le Guin

Stardust – Neil Gaimen

Summer Knight – Jim Butcher

Garth Nix – Sabriel

George RR Martin – Game of Thrones

Dragonriders of PERN

Kage Baker – Company Series

 
Credits:
Audio leveling by Patrick Brady
Music is by Mike Ruekberg
Website design by Vilmos: who has his own podcast

Apps are available with the bonus contest: iPhone or Android

 

My websites are www.jackiekashian.com and www.dorkforest.com

Review the show on iTunes

Feel free to e me. Jackie@jackiekashian.com

6 Comments
  • two and a half years ago
    JackieKashian
    Thanks Steve! I'm psyched your liking the show!!! and... hell yes i'm pscyched you're using the notes!
  • two and a half years ago
    Steve B
    This is the 2nd or 3rd podcast I've heard of TDF and I can tell that I really like it. Thank you for the notes. Writing down author and book names while I'm driving is just too dangerous.
  • two and a half years ago
    Jennifer Luberecki
    Squee! The Tolkien Professor and Jackie both like Harry Dresden! Unlike a lot of urban fantasy series, (cough, cough, Anita Blake), these books keep getting better throughout the series. Yeah for two more Harry Dresden fans!
  • two and a half years ago
    JackieKashian
    yes!
  • two and a half years ago
    AverageJoe
    I'm only ten minutes into this podcast and I think it's already my favorite episode ever. Maybe second to Mary Mack episode, which made me spit soup at work.
  • two and a half years ago
    Todd Mason
    Lots of interesting discussion...and I'll take the opportunity to push my post about Those Alongside Tolkien here again (or did I push it before?):
    http://socialistjazz.blogspot.com/2011/10/ffb-special-beyond-and-alongside.html

    ...where I devoted several lines to Peter Beagle (and THE LAST UNICORN among others) in the whirlwind tour, but it was some time back now (October) and deep down column...the only serious issues I'd take with the discussion would be, first, the notion that, while it's beyond unreasonable to criticize the Christian science-fantasy of C. S. Lewis for not keeping up with the science of his time (and you can be sure that rocketry and the understanding of gravitational and other forces was much farther along in the 1930s than Lewis was up on...it had to be, for Sputnik, et al, to happen, after all, two decades later), some sf was certainly keeping up with scientific advances and reasonable speculative technology (particularly the gadget-oriented sf of the Jules Verne tradition, also exemplified by the new fiction in early issues of AMAZING STORIES), and the kind of sociological sf that Wells was engaging in with THE TIME MACHINE, where How the gadget worked was less important than what the traveler saw when he got there (Wells could also write gadgety, and when he didn't, Verne particularly was put out by his Wild Fantasy), and then there was the kind of phantasmic sf/science-fantasy that, say, David Lindsay was writing, and the kind of slam-bang adventure that E. E. "Doc" Smith offered...and while the last usually tried to stick by reasonable gadgetry, that went out the window if something Kewl could be introduced for adventure purposes (faster than light travel, for obvious example). But relatively sober science-congnizant sf was Very much with us, even outside the magazine field, in 1938 (Huxley's BRAVE NEW WORLD, for example, was reasonably faithful to sensible tech in 1932).--The other issue I'd have is more arguable, but a number of the modern fantasy items you'll be teaching owe A Lot to work that didn't come up in discussion here, though I suspect (and certainly hope) they will in the actual classroom environment...certainly much of the grit and earthiness (and not a little of the ironic tone) of George R. R. Martin's work owes something to a number of his predecessors, including Jack Vance and through him such folks as James Branch Cabell and the other Decadents, as well as L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt and the other died in the wool historians who were also fantasists. Also, Corey Olsen...you got some Lewis even before Grimm or Andersen? And the layered overlapping of reality and fantasy, of course, is a tradition the fabulists as well as such latter-day geniuses (and inspirations to Beagle and others) such as Fritz Leiber and Robert Bloch and Theodore Sturgeon and Shirley Jackson and Jorge Luis Borges have enriched...and, of course, all literature, not solely fantasy literature, descends from early examples of fantasticated literature, including such oldest surviving examples as that of that bromance for the ages, Gilgamesh and Enkidu...