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The Dork Forest

Dork on Dork Dialog with Jackie Kashian. I am interested in whatever dorky thing you want to talk about. Guests speak to their love of books, TV, Movies, Comic books, websites, food, wrestling, cars, action figures and bees. There is room for all in The Dork Forest. This is a safe space. Credits: Music composed and performed by Mike Ruekberg (Sarah Cohen on intro) Audio fixes by Patrick Brady Website design by Vilmos
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jackiekashian.com Archive - Pre-September 2010 donate to the dorky effort
Nov 24, 2010

Episode 10

 

Steve Young and Aparna Nancherla talk about words and reading and writing. We find out that Steve’s true dorkdom is murder sites here in Los Angeles. I tell some more of the same stories and neither of us let Aparna talk enough. Gotta get her back on. We never get to hear about one of Steve’s favorite books The Mother Tongue.  But we learn, again, that I know less than nothing about music. It’s a good one. Tune the heck in!

 

Credits:
Intro and Outro Music by Mike Ruekberg

Audio leveling by ...Patrick Brady

3 Comments
  • six and a half years ago
    Todd Mason
    Or, even, TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT...
  • six and a half years ago
    Todd Mason
    The Bacall/Bogart film is TH HAVE AND HAVE NOT...loosely based on a Hemingway story. I like that one a little better than CASABLANCA, too, but I think I like DARK PASSAGE even better...and I like that (Ms.) Leigh Brackett had to do the heavy lifting on adapting THE BIG SLEEP, another fine film for both actors, because William Faulkner was consistently drunk and Raymond Chandler couldn't answer questions the scriptwriting team put to him; Brackett also writing great space opera and other sf and one crime-fiction novel in that period, and much later did the adatpation of THE LONG GOODBYE for the film directed by Robert Altman and starring Elliot Gould (at the end of her life, she wrote the treatment for the second and least bad STAR WARS film, but wasn't available to write a final script).

    The Chuck Palahniuk nonfiction collection Young refers to is, I think, STRANGER THAN FICTION.

    Since you're plumping for Tom Robbins and Octavia Butler and CP in the Recommended Reading segment, I'll go ahead and suggest Theodore Sturgeon, who loved to embed puns in his work such as "Affair with a Green Monkey," and whose work was profoundly influential on that of Ray Bradbury, Kurt Vonnegut, and not a few others...the last volume of his Collected Short Fiction, CASE AND THE DREAMER, has just been published. (Another admirer of his, Damon Knight, he who wrote "To Serve Man" much to the delight of THE TWILIGHT ZONE and THE SIMPSONS, as well as much more substantial work in short fiction, also was responsible for some wicked puns and references, overt and not so much.)

    A fun session, as so often! (This verstion of the note manages to spell Butler's name correctly...)
  • six and a half years ago
    Todd Mason
    The Bacall/Bogart film is TH HAVE AND HAVE NOT...loosely based on a Hemingway story. I like that one a little better than CASABLANCA, too, but I think I like DARK PASSAGE even better...and I like that (Ms.) Leigh Brackett had to do the heavy lifting on adapting THE BIG SLEEP, another fine film for both actors, because William Faulkner was consistently drunk and Raymond Chandler couldn't answer questions the scriptwriting team put to him; Brackett also writing great space opera and other sf and one crime-fiction novel in that period, and much later did the adatpation of THE LONG GOODBYE for the film directed by Robert Altman and starring Elliot Gould (at the end of her life, she wrote the treatment for the second and least bad STAR WARS film, but wasn't available to write a final script).

    The Chuck Palahniuk nonfiction collection Young refers to is, I think, STRANGER THAN FICTION.

    Since you're plumping for Tom Robbins and Octiavia Butler and CP in the Recommended Reading segment, I'll go ahead and suggest Theodore Sturgeon, who loved to embed puns in his work such as "Affair with a Green Monkey," and whose work was profoundly influential on that of Ray Bradbury, Kurt Vonnegut, and not a few others...the last volume of his Collected Short Fiction, CASE AND THE DREAMER, has just been published. (Another admirer of his, Damon Knight, he who wrote "To Serve Man" much to the delight of THE TWILIGHT ZONE and THE SIMPSONS, as well as much more substantial work in short fiction, also was responsible for some wicked puns and references, overt and not so much.)

    A fun session, as so often!