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The Dork Forest

Dork on Dork Dialog with Jackie Kashian. I am interested in whatever dorky thing you want to talk about. Guests speak to their love of books, TV, Movies, Comic books, websites, food, wrestling, cars, action figures and bees. There is room for all in The Dork Forest. This is a safe space. Credits: Music composed and performed by Mike Ruekberg (Sarah Cohen on intro) Audio fixes by Patrick Brady Website design by Vilmos
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The Dork Forest
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jackiekashian.com Archive - Pre-September 2010 donate to the dorky effort
Dec 10, 2010

A LOT of whispering. This week’s Dork Forest has a lot of whispering. Hopefully Patrick can make it not matter in the fix. Me, Mary Lynn Rajskub and Mike Siegel are also - ill prepared. Merry busiest season of the year. We do find out Mike is a travel dork, and we didn’t get into it ENOUGH for my tastes. He’ll be back. And Mary Lynn updated her racecar story from the last episode she was on, enjoys her dogs and some guilty pleasures in unathorized autobiography. And, there is plenty of me dorking out about many things. Enjoy.

 

Blackberry inventor - Mike Lazaridis

Russell Brand – My Booky Wook

Linda Barry - Cruddy

Malcolm Gladwell – Outliers: The Story of Success

Gloom, the card game

Janis Joplin interview – I’m sure there’s a better version – minute 6:50 to 7:50

Funny or Die video Mary Lynn did which may or may not be safe for work.

 

Credits:

Audio leveling by Patrick Brady!
Music by Mike Ruekberg 

3 Comments
  • almost seven years ago
    Todd Mason
    Oh! Yes! (Long day, and I'm trying to get other things done.) Though written and published long after THE MAN IN THE HIGH CASTLE and even the somewhat similar novel, DM Thomas's THE WHITE HOTEL, THE EXILE by WIlliam Kotzwinkle (the Walter the Farting Dog guy) is one of the most wrenching of timeslip fantasies involving the Nazi atrocities...Kotzwinkle writes brilliantly for adults, too (not that Walter can't be appreciated by adults...at a distance...)
  • almost seven years ago
    Todd Mason
    Or, even a sheer wall...no ropes, like that namby-pamby military basic training, mind you. And that scramble around THE SOUND OF HIS HORN was to suggest there were somewhat similar stories before and along with Sarban's and Dick's (a find little restaurant just off Market, Sarban and Dick's).
  • almost seven years ago
    Todd Mason
    The noise you hear is the sound of the pecksniff clearing his throat...Lynda Barry (note "variant" spelling of first name), she of ERNIE POOK'S COMEEK in the "alternate" papers (next to Matt Groening's LIFE IN HELL and Charles Burns's BIG BABY all those years ago...David Lynch's THE ANGRIEST DOG IN THE WORLD, too...) is also a brilliant spoken-word person, but you probably won't hear her on THIS AMERICAN LIFE a) because her voice isn't more nasal than Ira Glass's (required for the non-"newsy" guests) and b) because they apparently had a tough breakup some years back. But she recorded an album for that Windham Hill spinoff spoken-word records label Gang of Seven, THE LYNDA BARRY EXPERENCE, which is required listening and might well remind you a bit of Maria Bamford's work. (Amazon vendors want some bread for it, though.)

    Philip K. Dick's THE MAN IN THE HIGH CASTLE, ambiguous resolution and all (he was, after all, a slightly late Beat, or so I say), was perhaps the Mostest of Germany Wins WW2 science fiction, but not the Firstest...even on the bestseller lists: "Sarban" (John William Wall)'s THE SOUND OF HIS HORN (1952) also has a dreamlike quality to it...Nazis winning outright (as opposed to too-close cousins in entirely too many circumstances) had come too damn close for mostly everyone, I guess, and particularly in 1952 with a hell of a lot of gloom and attempts at bootrapping out of destruction and desolation going on around the world. Other stories, less well-known, came between and these two and even before Sarban's.

    You have my utter sympathy in your and your guests' discomfort with open heights...my junior high school had an Outward Bound-style component to Phys Ed in the '70s, and I was not then nor now getting on a zip-line for anyone, nor climbing over a shear wall with only fellow students to pull me up...I'd anchor them, but then I've been 6'1" since 6th grade, and I doubted too many of them could handle my mass. I don't know if psychologists call it acro-agoraphobia, but I sure do...elevators and airplanes are fine...vertiginously looking out even certain skyscraper windows, which bend in at the bottom, No. Not happily, anyway. The observation deck at the Empire State...with all those railings and such...sure. And the fear of the impulsive act sure is a fun scare, ain't it?

    Ms. Rajskub is glorious to behold, audibly and visually (and great fun and also a bit [appropriately] saddening in, for example, SUNSHINE CLEANING), but it's a high bar in terms of being the best-looking dork to appear on TDF...even if I've had a "media crush" on only two or so guests I'm aware of, and at least one ex-model who comes to mind (not one of the two)...

    Oddly enough, Bob Costas was the last comparable guy to Cavett on commercial television, and he less risk-taking than Cavett, but a similarly good interviewer ("regular-guy" rather than twee around the edges, but excellent on LATER with a range of guests far beyond the sports bailiwick he's back to). Charlie Rose got a bit worse when he went from CBS overnight to an hour on PBS, perhaps feeling he had keep things Moving more...Craig Ferguson is probably the best (least bad?) interviewer with a chat show on network right now, but it does at times seem, as someone was noting on a podcast the other day, a bit effortful.

    You've picked up the baton well, Jackie! Still the friendliest podcast I hear, and certainly the least fraught...particularly from the complex of comedians in LA (where almost all the comedy podcasts seem to emanate from). Both you and your guests in this episode were utterly charming.