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The Dork Forest

Dork on Dork Dialog with Jackie Kashian. I am interested in whatever dorky thing you want to talk about. Guests speak to their love of books, TV, Movies, Comic books, websites, food, wrestling, cars, action figures and bees. There is room for all in The Dork Forest. This is a safe space. Credits: Music composed and performed by Mike Ruekberg (Sarah Cohen on intro) Audio fixes by Patrick Brady Website design by Vilmos
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The Dork Forest
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jackiekashian.com Archive - Pre-September 2010 donate to the dorky effort
Jun 19, 2012

Al Jackson (@aljacksoncomedy) is a great comic that I met in New York City. We talk old school Hip Hop, UFC, and he interviews me a lot. A LOT… so that was fun. I need to have him back and interview HIM. What a great guy. You should definitely go to see his awesome standup comedy. Because it’s so great. Enjoy.

Donation Button, if you wish is on www.dorkforest.com

NOTES:

Hannibal Burress

Erin Jackson

Nat King Cole

Brenda Lee

Ruth Brown

KRS ONE – Jimmy Hat

Biggie Smalls – Ready to Die

Biggie Smalls – Juicy

Alabama Shakes

Sugar Hill Gang

Hip Hop Documentary: Beats Rhymes & Life

Christopher “Kid” Reid

New Edition

Jermaine Dupri

UFC

Tougaloo College, Jackson, MS

James Earl Ray

Civil Rights Museum

Big Daddy Kane

Closed Captioning Services

Northern Sun Merchandising

Nate Bargatze

K9 Bite Suit

Vargus Mason

April Macie

Alycia Cooper

FOB = Forward Operating Base,

COB = Combat Operating? Base

JSS = Joint Services Support

The Serpent Prince

Wu Tang Clan

What to Watch/Listen:

The Fat Boys

Digital Underground

Straight Out of Compton

Tribe Called Quest

Public Enemy

Classic 80’s Hip Hop

Breakin’ Two

Doomsday Preppers

Read:

The Glass Castle

Credits: 

Audio leveling by Patrick Brady
Music is by Mike Ruekberg
Website design by Vilmos: who has his own podcast

Apps are available with the bonus contest: iPhone or Android

APP NOTE:
Professor Elemental Fighting Trousers

My websites are www.jackiekashian.com and www.dorkforest.com

7 Comments
  • five and a half years ago
    jackie
    you have to figure people ask her all the time about the spider. BUT... maybe not. New York city and all that :)
  • five and a half years ago
    Todd Mason
    (I don't think I could resist asking the bartender about her spider.)(Hence not having a Home Bar.)
  • five and a half years ago
    TM
    Or, for an example of the early dancehall toasters who also were rapping in the earlier '70s, U-Roy:
    http://youtu.be/KpukQ41av00

  • five and a half years ago
    TM
    I'm looking forward to those stories, where there's no obvious punchline as yet, and I suspect you're being excessively self-critical (and all that concentrated travel is indeed wearying, as I've known even without having to do performance multiple nights while coping with it).
  • five and a half years ago
    TM
    Oh, do listen to the Poets (such albums as THIS IS MADNESS) and particularly Scott-Heron, who was better, I'd say...SMALL TALK AT 125TH AND LENNOX, his first album (1970), has "Televised" and a number of shorter raps, such as "Whitey on the Moon", and it's not only the same sort of thing as Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five were doing in '79, but it's more fully-realized. Certainly the Poets were Not Funsters, but Scott-Heron has a lot wit along with his anger. I'll admit I prefer the full-band version of "Revolution" from '71 and PIECES OF A MAN:
    http://youtu.be/QnJFhuOWgXg --try it again...

    --The rappers in the park were inspired by these folks and the dancehall toasters, along with the jazz poets, talking blues folks, and other antecedents...
  • five and a half years ago
    JackieKashian
    I think rap and hip hop as a genre started, traditionally, with the sugar hill gang. (what we meant.) there's been spoken word music for long before. Toally get that
  • five and a half years ago
    Todd Mason
    Well...the notion that the Sugar Hill Gang were the first rappers is already a big huge lie, as the Last Poets were rapping in the latter '60s, Gil Scott-Heron was informing us that The Revolution Would Not Be Televised by the earliest '70s, and the Jamaican version toasters were very much in place at about the same time. There is no reasonable definition of rap that can exclude these folks, even if one wants to leave out the jazz poetry and talking blues that preceded them.

    Ruth Brown got going in the '50s, "Late Date" being an early record for her, and, happily, not All of her songs were about putting up with being a heavy bag, but, yeah, probably too many were (any being too many...at least Aretha Franklin's best early song Sort Of like that is "Take It Like You Give It")...Nat "King" Cole likewise doing his brilliant piano work on record in the late 40s, though the singing certainly made him more money.