The Dork Forest

Dork on Dork Dialog with Jackie Kashian. I am interested in whatever dorky thing you want to talk about. Guests speak to their love of books, TV, Movies, Comic books, websites, food, wrestling, cars, action figures and bees. There is room for all in The Dork Forest. This is a safe space. Credits: Music composed and performed by Mike Ruekberg (Sarah Cohen on intro) Audio fixes by Patrick Brady Website design by Vilmos
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jackiekashian.com Archive - Pre-September 2010 donate to the dorky effort
Oct 4, 2012 5
5 Comments
  • almost two years ago
    Todd Mason
    Another slightly amusing coincidence is that ABC started to become a genuinely powerful tv network in no small part with the popularity of the such '70s Paramount series as HAPPY DAYS and its spinoffs.

    Which also reminds me of something more germane to the discussion here...I lived near good-sized urban centers for most, though not all, of my youth...and even in the '70s I Never had Just Three Channels to choose from...leaving aside that there were always NET, then PBS channels with a fair amount of interesting programming available, certainly when my family moved to the Boston 'burbs in 1969, but there were also independent commercial stations, which didn't have the network afternoon shows (soaps and to some extent game shows) nor could they usually afford the big syndicated chat/variety shows (such as Merv Griffin's or Mike Douglas's) that the commercial network affiliates usually snapped up for their local schedule holes...so these independent commercial channels were the source of a lot of cartoon watching, of both theatrical cartoon packages and the made-for-tv items, repeats or imports (such as KIMBA and SPEED RACER). Of course, in the Boston area, the hosted kid shows, imitations of Bozo and HOWDY DOODY, were still on network affiliates during the day (notably then in Boston, MAJOR MUDD, an astronaut, and at Manchester, NH, ABC station Channel 9 UNCLE GUS, a somewhat inert guy in a fishing cap)(I'm sure at least a few over the years wanted Uncle Gus to moderate one of the NH Presidential debates Ch. 9 would host). But the elderly cartoon mixes were on the indy UHF stations, along with GILLIGAN'S ISLAND and THREE STOOGES syndicated runs.... When we moved to Northern Connecticut in 1973, suddenly there were no independent stations, but the Springfield, MA and Hartford network affiliates had to slug it out for access to the bigger syndie items, and would as a result find themselves programming the same sorts of cartoon packages and such, as well as try to find reasons you should watch the Hartford ABC station rather than the Springfield one, and vice verse (the Hartford ABC station did its best to be innovative, taking on, for example, the syndicated SPACE 1999 on 7:30 Tuesdays and pre-empting till Sunday evening this piddly LOVE, AMERICAN STYLE spinoff HAPPY DAYS in the their first seasons...you might guess how long that lasted). While I missed seeing THE CREATURE DOUBLE FEATURE every Saturday afternoon, which followed THE OUTER LIMITS repeats, when we left West Peabody, MA, in Hazardville, CT, I got to see THRILLER (with Boris Karloff) repeats on a Hartford station. As with big-studio film, the early '70s were a very good time for fairly innovative television...and if the latter '70s weren't, so much (thanks to the increasing popularity of mindless ABC fare and the attempts to imitate it), there was often something good on on one station or another, when one spun the dial (when there were still dials to be spun)...
  • almost two years ago
    Todd Mason
    One thing I'll note, is that TIME FOR BEANY in the original puppet show format was one of the anchor series, and perhaps the most highly regarded (it won an Emmy), of the small and relatively shortlived Paramount Television Network, which ran, with KTLA in LA as its flagship station, from 1948-1956...the network was sort of the stepsibling of the Dumont Network, which Paramount had also invested in, and some stations affiliated with both struggling US tv networks, the only ones to both get off the ground, and then fold, till the quick death of the United Network in the latter '60s...one wonders if the latter-day Paramount network called itself United Paramount Network in part to thumb their corporate nose at fate and bad luck associated with those labels...though, if anything, the merged CW is more Paramount/CBSish than it is Warner Communications' baby. (Meanwhile, one reason we still have an ABC and don't have a Dumont is that the Paramount Theaters, split off by the Feds in antitrust suits from Paramount in 1949, decided to buy into ABC in 1951. Thus, in a sense, Paramount or ex-Paramount divisions had a hand in three competing, struggling networks by 1951...one phrase that might come to mind is "corporate incest"...and another is "spreading yourself way too thin". Another advantage that ABC had that the others didn't was a large radio network, the former NBC Blue network, that the Feds had similarly forced NBC to divest in 1943, and thus became the ABC Radio Network...the ABC radio networks diversified and flourished in the '60s, but ABC TV was consistently an also-ran behind CBS and NBC till the latter '70s, and particularly struggled in the '50s.
  • almost two years ago
    Todd Mason
    (Smiling because I pointed this one out to Dick aka Richard A. Lupoff, with Ms. Pat Lupoff the coeditors/publishers of XERO, the sf fanzine that was also one of the founding zines of comics 'zinery which helped, I suspect, warp the young mind of Jerry Beck, and once and occasional host of Pacifica Radio's BOOKWAVES, as well as an important and impressive writer and editor professionally in several fields.)

    http://www.tachyonpublications.com/book/Xero.html
  • almost two years ago
    JackieKashian
    I wonder if the animation he talks of is On DVD...probably the movies... Interesting. If I find out I'll let you know.
  • almost two years ago
    Dick Lupoff
    This looks like a spectacular event. I will certainly set my DVR to capture it. Will it also be available on DVD?