The Dork Forest

Dork on Dork Dialog with Jackie Kashian. I am interested in whatever dorky thing you want to talk about. Guests speak to their love of books, TV, Movies, Comic books, websites, food, wrestling, cars, action figures and bees. There is room for all in The Dork Forest. This is a safe space. Credits: Music composed and performed by Mike Ruekberg (Sarah Cohen on intro) Audio fixes by Patrick Brady Website design by Vilmos
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jackiekashian.com Archive - Pre-September 2010 donate to the dorky effort
Nov 20, 2012 15

Guy Branum is a funny, funny comic and writer. You might have seen him on Chelsea Lately a lot; and he worked at G4. He's a great comic. He also knows some seriously obscure facts about Canada. Probably not obscure if you're Canadian. It’s excellent. Enjoy.

ALSO: Nov/Dec are “do not donate” months. Donate to a foodbank or the Hurricane relief or someone else. January… donate to me. $100 each for the year would be great.

All Things Comedy is a Podcast Empire Umbrella Thing. Check it out.
In January, donation Button, www.dorkforest.com This month, foodbank it! 

Review the show on iTunes
Feel free to e me. Jackie@jackiekashian.com 

NOTES: 
Dork Forest Tshirt that Bret Chamber’s Designed
Quenya
Yuba City
Ishi
Chumash
Oroville
Oroville Dam
To Read:
Joan Didion
  On Self Respect
  The Year of Magical Thinking
Punjabi Sikhs in Yuba City
Nunavut
Prairie Island Indian Casino
Krua Thai
Michael Everson EP of TDF
Byerly’s (owned by LUNDS! – I am vindaloo!)
A great article about Canada
1963 Canadian Flag Debate
First French-speaking Canadian prime minister 
Guy’s fave Canada Song

Credits:
Audio leveling by
 Patrick Brady
Music is by Mike Ruekberg
Website design by Vilmos: who has his own podcast
Apps are available with the bonus contest: iPhone or Android

15 Comments
  • almost two years ago
    JackieKashian
    I KNOW... I was so happy to do this one. Glad you liked it... cuz it was DORKY.
  • almost two years ago
    Cindy D.
    Wow! More episodes like this one. Wait, episodes? What do you call one unit of podcast? Anyway, I have always been woefully unlearned in things Canadian (along with, apparently, most of my American brethren). This was the most fun history lesson ever. And continued in the comments, even. :D
  • almost two years ago
    Guy Branum
    also, everyone, let's call me on my real mistake, Angband, not Angmar is "iron fortress"
  • almost two years ago
    JackieKashian
    ha@! if i wasn't getting so many spambots on OTHER eps... I'd leave the comments unmoderated... just know I have to approve comments again, because of the popularity of Laurie Kilmartin's book on the NYT booklist. what an asshole.
  • almost two years ago
    TM
    You gotta love a republican/populist argument that is also a pun on a fashion magazine's title...
  • almost two years ago
    sarahg
    The stupidity of our system is that we are still part of a monarchy not our federalism-becoming some type of parliamentary republic with proportional representation would fix many of our issues and increase the dismal voting numbers (something shared with the US) as well as the stupidity caused by first past the post. The idea that a 2 party/increased provincial power system is an improvement seems crazy to me (as does dismissing the importance of the NDP, who actually have very similar platforms to how Quebec votes on most issues and have played an integral role in Canadian politics) but there is lots of room for improvement. I would like to see better municipal representation\taxation and coalition building in all levels of government. Also no Harper and no Queen.
  • almost two years ago
    Todd Mason
    Fair enough, but...a two-party system too often, as now, leaves us with a slightly right of center party and a thoroughly reactionary party, with almost no chance for even a serious protest vote to be felt...the centrist party can (and does) take for granted that all the opponents of reaction will either not bother to vote or will settle for the less insane alternative. At least most of the governments in even the devolved Canadian system are coalitions, which can suggest (whether correctly or not is another matter) that a broader spectrum of voter/opinion is being represented to some degree.

    Definitely, the Perot Reform campaign was the most serious recent "third" party campaign, but we shouldn't forget the George Wallace, the John Anderson, nor certainly the splintering of the Democratic Party in 1948 or in 1860 (unless we want to see the Bell Constitutional Union effort as a last desperate remnant of the Whigs who wouldn't join with the abolitionists in the new Republican Party), nor the showing of the largely Republican Progressives in 1912 or 1924 (the latter in fusion with the Socialist Party, which could only warp Fox News's collective brainpan) or the Gilded Age Populists as indicative of how much resentment of our two-party default there is. Personally, my own resentment remains that the best candidate/platform of my lifetime, Sonia Johnson of the (Greenish) Citizens Party couldn't vote for herself any more than I could vote for her, since we both lived in Virginia at the time.

    It looks as if your comment was somehow cut off...
  • almost two years ago
    Guy Branum
    Todd-

    That there's no provincial NDP in Quebec but they won a majority of Quebec seats in Federal Parliament is weird. That what started out as a protest party of the prairie provinces won a majority of Quebec's Federal seats is weird, because tension between the Prairies and Quebec has been one of the defining features of Canadian politics for the last 50 years.

    And yeah, any time you have first past the post voting, you have ignored votes, but in a multi-party system, you are ending up with victors earning well under 50% a larger percent of the time. In the US, with a strong two-party system, this is limited. The margins by which winning candidates are under 50% is much, much lower. The US's biggest 3rd party challenge was in 1992, but Clinton still got 42% of the vote. Compare that with the 37% and 39% Harper pulled in his last two wins. Last election the Liberals pulled 19% of the vote, but only got 11% of the seats in the House of Commons. That's a big swing and one of the dangers of a multi-party first past the post system. The 93 election with the PCs getting 16 % of the vote but
  • almost two years ago
    Guy Branum
    Cosine- my issues isn't with a parliamentary system, it's with a federalized parliamentary system. In most European countries, the parliamentary government is unitary, with supreme authority. UK and France don't have nearly the devolved power that the US or Canada do. Germany has a federalized system, but the balance of power between the Fed government and the Lander is very much centered on the Feds. Also, Germany is geographically small and has a very consistent party culture.

    Currently BC is Liberal/NDB with NO conservatives at all, Alberta is run by the Conservatives with some party I just learned about (the Wildrose Party) as official opposition, manitoba is NDP/Cons with one liberal, SK is run by the Saskatchewan party, which is an anti-NDP alliance of Cons and Libs, and Quebec is all PQ and liberal even though their federal delegation is mostly NDP. Point is, your federalized legislative structure, and the lack of a relationship between Provincial and Federal politics (like the German Bundesrat) makes for a CRAZY national partisan structure that leads to massive realignments of power, and huge portions of the vote being ignored.
  • almost two years ago
    JackieKashian
    heh. fun.
  • almost two years ago
    TM
    Sorry, typo...it was 1993 that the Proggy Cons fell down so hard. (Not a good year for NDP, either, really.)
  • almost two years ago
    Todd Mason
    We've had more than our share of presidents and others elected to office without the majority of votes cast, and able to govern thus, as well...leaving aside all those folks who don't vote but who could, in every election, including the last one...whom I tend to assume don't find that anyone represents their views or interests persuasively. (And we've had our academics, as well, including Woodrow Wilson, whose abuse of rights of US citizens puts even such fellow stampers on the Bill of Rights as the first presidents, Andrew Jackson, Lincoln and younger Bush to shame.)

    Sad news on the job front...PARTNERS (CBS) has been cancelled.
  • almost two years ago
    JackieKashian
    I've taken off the moderate comments so that you can talk it out... I will clean up the spambots I get (on the rest of the eps) after. WOW... my first controversial TDF. alright then.
  • almost two years ago
    Todd Mason
    There's nothing particularly weird about the New Democratic Party...it's just the leftist/social-democratic party in Canada, has been around for decades and decades, and gets people elected to various offices on a regular basis.

    As WIKIPEDIA currently notes:
    "They currently govern the provinces of Manitoba and Nova Scotia, form the Official Opposition in British Columbia and Saskatchewan, and have sitting members in every provincial legislature except those of Quebec (where there is no provincial NDP), New Brunswick (although the New Brunswick NDP had an elected member until 2006) and Prince Edward Island."

    Meanwhile, I enjoyed watching the election returns in 1994 where the Progressive Conservative Party, Mulroney's, completely collapsed...C-SPAN imported CBC coverage.
  • almost two years ago
    Cosine
    Wow, there is a LOT of misunderstanding in Mr. Branum's information on Canada.

    His view that we have the stupidest form of government in the world is shocking misinformed. Yes, the ruling party controls the government BUT only if they were elected with a MAJORITY of the seats, which usually doesn't happen. Usually the ruling party does not have a majority of the seats meaning that the ruling party is FORCED to work with opposition parties to generate buy-in for their policys, reforms, budgets.

    Think about that for a minute, can you understand how that may not be the "stupidest form of government in the world"?