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The Dork Forest

Dork on Dork Dialog with Jackie Kashian. I am interested in whatever dorky thing you want to talk about. Guests speak to their love of books, TV, Movies, Comic books, websites, food, wrestling, cars, action figures and bees. There is room for all in The Dork Forest. This is a safe space. Credits: Music composed and performed by Mike Ruekberg (Sarah Cohen on intro) Audio fixes by Patrick Brady Website design by Vilmos
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jackiekashian.com Archive - Pre-September 2010 donate to the dorky effort
Mar 16, 2011

 

Eric Drysdale writes for The Colbert Report and I wasn’t too dorky about that. But I wanted to be. Instead I let him dork out about his freaking love of 3D and the Viewmaster and how it’s all come together for a live show that he does The Man With F.E.E.E.T. (here in LA March 16, 2011 downtown, details on the website). You can also just get a viewmaster and the “reels” on that website to enjoy in your own home. I learned stuff about cameras and the history of the Viewmaster. It’s a great ep.

 

Notes:

Parlor StereoScope

ViewMaster (wiki, origin story)

Viewmaster – Fisher Price

Tru-Vue

Canon Hackers Dev Kit

High Dynamic Range Photography

 

What Eric enjoyed recently that might interest you:

Andy Warhol Diaries

The Rise and Fall of the Bible

Charles Phoenix LA 3D collector

 

And I talk about this book I enjoy a great deal:

The Gospel According to Jesus – Stephen Mitchell

 

My show schedules, videos of my stand up, Ranger T-shirt and the donation button are all on the websites: www.jackiekashian.com and www.dorkforest.com and probably the facebook fan page.

 

Do you live in Seattle? Stand Up Show tickets now available (March 28th) WITH Rylee NewtonJ!  Also… LIVE taping of TDF (March 27th, 5pm) with fun guests. Heh. Fun.

Credits:
Audio leveling by Patrick Brady
The Music is  by
Mike Ruekberg
.
My Website was redone by
Vilmos: who has his OWN podcast (all road comic interviews… fascinating)

 

Thanks for the orders and the donations this week and, as always, thanks for listening. Take care out there! Jackie

3 Comments
  • almost six years ago
    cardaddy
    Amazing site! Many thanks for creating it. Keep working that way.
  • over six years ago
    Todd Mason
    http://www.3dstereo.com/vmhist.html for a concise VM history with some nice images from the sets and their packages...
  • over six years ago
    Todd Mason
    Ha! I remember the 1960s version of this one, as detailed in that link. I'm just a little surprised that Drysdale, given his knowledge of and experience with the VM reels, wasn't aware of the various sorts of projection and rear-lit toys that were not quite the rivals to VM (or even the VM projector, which of course couldn't produce 3D images, but allowed one to project VM reel slides onto screens or walls in the same manner as standard slide or flim-strip projectors.

    I had a few of that kind of toy, as well, and it always was a little too easy to burn the image media, whether in the reels or the other products.

    Consumer stereo-image cameras were widely, if not inexpensively, available in the 1950s...I remember seeing ads for them in older NATIONAL GEOGRAPHICs I was looking at as a child in the 1970s...presumably, an older style of stereopticon was necessary to look at the results.

    And I certainly didn't mean to denigrate a good pep talk, with a Tarot reader, either...you'll note that I compared her work favorably to the rather blunt crystal ball "psychic"...while not perceiving much actual prediction about the card-reading.

    THE WAY...I didn't realize that it leaned in the Jesus Freak (post-hippie) direction (one observer in the early '70s referred to that movement as "toking Jesus"), as most of the church folk I knew who employed it seemed to be of the more fundamentalist sort...I suspect that there are those who will chase or bother you for any criticism of even THE WAY as for any other text...

    Including the more fanatic fans of Robert Heinlein, who will shun or damn you for any criticism of that Holy Writ. Even his best work is often a bit too preachy for me, even when amusing. Some of his contemporaries, particularly Fritz Leiber and Theodore Sturgeon anong those writing for the same magazines and publishers (Kurt Vonnegut, too, a few years later), were able to put across their analyses with rather better prose and characterization and considerably more suttlety when they felt like employing it.

    A pity Drysdale didn't manage to get to discussion of his PEANUTS love, given particularly the interesting clay-model-diorama PEANUTS ViewMaster sets, meant to maximize the 3-D experience, that were offered in the '60s and later, when I was getting mine...

    Jackie, you out yourself as a novel-reader...no short fiction to speak of? I suspect THE SIMARILLION, in small doses at least, might work better as an aundiobook than it does as a written work.

    As I was writing about VM reels the other week:
    For another example of Stuff You Probably Don't See Much Of Any Longer: ViewMaster. Now, there's a thriving collectors market, aided like most such fandoms by eBay and its competitors over the years, but the new ViewMaster offers for sale the last time I was around a VM display (at a Toys R Us) were very sorry, indeed...which I suspect indicated the worsening fortunes of the retail outlet almost as much as the downgraded state of VM in a video and console-game age, with animated 3D still problematic but available. But the beauty of at least some the nature and science packs (VM typically sold its slide discs in three-packs), and the mild (or not so mild) joy of some of the entertainment packs, at least if one was capable of enjoying that kind of photography, was hard to deny (I did thoroughly enjoy the plasticine clay artistry of some of the PEANUTS cartoon adaptations). And, of course, that sort of stereo photography wasn't just useful for the entertainment and instruction of children: my only college roommate was a studio art and pre-med major, and as such brought home discs of autopsy photos...a corpse missing a mandible was among the most disturbing images I'd seen to that time. And in dead, nearly palpable color.