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The Dork Forest

Dork on Dork Dialog with Jackie Kashian. I am interested in whatever dorky thing you want to talk about. Guests speak to their love of books, TV, Movies, Comic books, websites, food, wrestling, cars, action figures and bees. There is room for all in The Dork Forest. This is a safe space. Credits: Music composed and performed by Mike Ruekberg (Sarah Cohen on intro) Audio fixes by Patrick Brady Website design by Vilmos
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jackiekashian.com Archive - Pre-September 2010 donate to the dorky effort
Dec 20, 2011
9 Comments
  • almost six years ago
    jackie kashian
    I do have a couple relatives who "ethinic" it up. heh... he can pronounce it as he will. as long as he plays it!!
  • almost six years ago
    Todd Mason
    And will the host still be calling you "Cash-yan" for this week's UNFICTIONAL, or did that just seem to fit with "Introduction to Sales"? (Do any of your family go for that pronunciation?)

    --And, you know, my favorite Michael Chabon so far is his novella about the elderly Sherlock Holmes treating with a Nazi Holocaust-era mystery, THE FINAL SOLUTION, rather than THE AMAZING ADVENTURES OF K & K...though his exoticized historical adventure/quest novel (the kind of thing next door to fantasy or sf), GENTLEMEN OF THE ROAD, starts really well, too (I need to get back to it)...
  • almost six years ago
    jackie kashian
    seriously, you are well read! man. I'm doing another Unfictional that will come out Friday :) I dunno if it will just be on the radio but, eventually, it will be on the website. :)
  • almost six years ago
    Todd Mason
    And thanks for the UNFICTIONAL link! Since they dumped Sandra Tsing Loh, I look upon KCRW's pages mostly as the less problematic link-source for Harry Shearer's LE SHOW...I would've missed that indefinitely...
  • almost six years ago
    Todd Mason
    And, of course, the comic books largely arose in the US along with and from the publishers of the pulp magazines, and "hero" pulps emerged in the early '30s with such leading characters as DOC SAVAGE and THE SHADOW (even though the Shadow was originally just a radio-anthology host character, a bit along the lines of the Crypt-Keeper in TALES FROM THE CRYPT), so the comics heroes took some cues from the pulp novellas that would lead off the issues of their magazines (those novellas widely republished in the 1960s and '70s in paperback), and inspiring more obscure characters such as Captain Zero (the first edition of Peter Nichols's SCIENCE FICTION ENCYCLOPEDIA noted that, close paraphrase, when Capt. Zero was invisible, in his stories, he spoke in italics...perhaps it's just me, but I've always found that hilarious), and there were supervillain titles (mostly ripping off such characters as Fu Manchu) such as DR. YEN SIN and THE MYSTERIOUS WU FANG (both also hilarious in their charming racism). And, of course, while there never was a TARZAN pulp magazine, nor a CONAN THE BARBARIAN pulp, Tarzan got his start, as did John Carter of Mars, when Edgar Rice Burroughs began selling stories to the first pulp, ARGOSY (which would eventually become a kind of ESQUIRE imitator, though the title has been revived several times as a fiction magazine...its spin-off, ALL-STORY magazine, has had its title revived over the last decade plus by Francis Ford Coppola as ZOETROPE ALL-STORY), and the Cimmerian first popped up in Robert Howard stories for the legendary fantasy and horror pulp WEIRD TALES (a magazine which has also been revived several times over the decades, and still going though it's pretty obscure and in rough financial shape at the moment--true in the Lovecraft/Howard/Clark Ashton Smith days of the pulp WT, too). Tarzan and Conan, of course, have had their own comics, and their imitators have had both comics and pulps to themselves. --New anthologies of prose about heroes and superheroes have gone beyond established comics characters, going back at least as far as the WEIRD HEROES anthologies, edited by Byron Preiss in the latter '70s, and more recently represented by the likes of WHO CAN SAVE US NOW? edited by Owen King and John McNally and MASKED edited by Lou Anders.
  • almost six years ago
    Todd Mason
    Or, even, as do such lesser novels...

    --More modern writing about superheroic sorts include Batman novels by the likes of Joe R. Lansdale and Andrew Vachss among many others, (Lansdale's the better writer, though Batman is Vachss's kind of character, too...both have done interesting work as comics scripters as well as writing bestselling prose), and there was a series of novels about DC characters published around 2003 that really kicked off a pocket industry...I was very much looking forward to the WONDER WOMAN novel by Carol Lay, a pretty brilliant strip cartoonist, but it kinda showed that this was her first novel (if not quite as blatantly as that did, say, with Penn Jillette's SOCK); I gather that most of these books were written by folks with more experience as prose writers, including fantasy writer Craig Shaw Gardner.

    I rather liked this anthology, when such stuff was still pretty novel (in 1989), featuring an array of crime-fiction and sf/fantasy writers:
    The Further Adventures of Batman ed. Martin H. Greenberg (Bantam 0-553-28270-0, Jul ’89 [Jun ’89], $3.95, 401pp, pb) [Batman] Original shared-world anthology of 14 Batman stories by well-known sf and mystery writers, published to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the caped crusader.

    1 · Death of the Dreammaster · Robert Sheckley · na *
    69 · Bats · Henry Slesar · nv *
    101 · Subway Jack · Joe R. Lansdale · nv *
    139 · The Sound of One Hand Clapping · Max Allan Collins · ss *
    159 · Neutral Ground · Mike Resnick · ss *
    165 · Batman in Nighttown · Karen Haber & Robert Silverberg · nv *
    191 · The Batman Memos · Stuart M. Kaminsky · ss *
    207 · Wise Men of Gotham · Edward Wellen · nv *
    247 · Northwestward [Black Widowers] · Isaac Asimov · ss *
    267 · Daddy’s Girl · William F. Nolan · ss *
    285 · Command Performance · Howard Goldsmith · na *
    343 · The Pirate of Millionaires’ Cove · Edward D. Hoch · ss *
    363 · The Origin of the Polarizer · George Alec Effinger · nv *
    393 · Idol · Ed Gorman · ss *
  • almost six years ago
    Todd Mason
    Well, among the classics and "classics," Philip Wylie's GLADIATOR has long been suspected of being one of the inspirations for Superman the character. ODD JOHN by Olaf Stapledon involves a guy who might well be "homo superior"...as are such lesser novels as SLAN by A. E. van Vogt, CHILDREN OF THE ATOM by Wilmar Shiras, and (only partly kidding) ATLAS SHRUGGED. Frank Robinson's THE POWER involves what amounts to a supervillain, a fellow with psi powers who is, shall we write, not friendly (Robinson, one of the first "out" gay men writing a lot of sf in the US, was also for a while the conductor of "The PLAYBOY Advisor" column--he was quite aware of the irony--and co-author with buddy and fellow sf writer Thomas Scortia of a couple of "disaster" novels in the '70s, including THE GLASS INFERNO, much better than the other guy's novel THE TOWER, the two books thrown into a blender for script adaptation as THE TOWERING INFERNO). Theodore Sturgeon's MORE THAN HUMAN is perhaps the best novel still about a multi-person gestalt personality that is, well, more than human...Sturgeon liked to explore that sort of thing in many of his best stories.
  • almost six years ago
    jackie kashian
    Kavalier and Clay? Sherlock Holmes? Novelization? Toss us a bone and name a couple, man!! (thanks for the comment) :)
  • almost six years ago
    Rob S.
    There are novels about superheroes.